Collective Living

Collective Living

What entices a person to move to another country, city or area can vary or be a combination of many things. It can be work, school or recreation. To be attractive for occupancy, a city or neighbourhood needs to offer many kinds of living. Mankind is used to living in herd, that is a well-known fact, but the size of the herd can vary. Everything from the young couple in love to the solidarity in a collective living.  

Origin and history

Collective living can be seen in many variants, but the common denominator is that the people in collective living are usually not related. They share a living because of political, practical, religious or social reasons. By living this closely the relationships between the people develop to being like those in a family. Common elements in a collective living is shared cooking and eating, shared economy, and help in childcare. Living in collectives can be traced back to the time when people lived in caves, but the modern collective started in Israel in the beginning of the 20th century with the kibbutz movement. In the ‘60s collective living became common in cities around Europe, mainly by young adults. The Flower-Power and Hippie culture in the late ‘60s and the beginning of the ‘70s thrived in the collective living. In Northern Europe you could see, in the early ‘60s, how the collective living developed into production collectives. Young people moved out from the big cities to the countryside to live by and with nature, by their own produced food and in houses produced by themselves. This was called “the Green Wave”

The modern collective

The modern collective
The modern collective

As earlier mentioned, collective livings can look different. The modern collective can be sharing facilities with others. This is often seen where apartments share cooking areas and dining room because of lack of space in the apartments. Toilets, showers, laundry rooms are other rooms are other facilities often shared in modern collective livings. This also means that those living in the collective have to take a bigger responsibility for the joint areas. Living collectively has many advantages. Besides being social and fun there are of course other advantages as well. You get more space for your money if you compare to renting an apartment having all the facilities and space that you get. In a collective living there are often lots of different rooms for different activities, like a playroom for kids or a music or movie room, a library or training room which gives a lot of opportunities for a rich life. Since this kind of living is really social, you get to hang out with your friends and neighbours a lot. Of course, when there are advantages, there are also disadvantages. Living in a collective, you need to be prepared to adapt to other people. The will of one person is not always in harmony with the others and it is easy that frictions surface. It also means a bigger responsibility and the private times can be small or even non-existing.

If collective living sounds tempting it is crucial to meet with your co-livers and neighbours and get to know them well before you move in. Maybe a trial period to see if this kind of living suites you and to get to know the situation before you make a decision.