Our Strategy

 

In the Fall of 2011, a dozen neighborhood volunteers walked up and down every street in the neighborhood that has a publicly owned tree growing in the right-of-way (which we defined as sidewalk edge to sidewalk edge). We measured the tree size, noted health issues, and identified Ash. On certain blocks where the existing tree lawn (the strip of grass between the sidewalk and curb) is too narrow to permit new trees to be planted, we also inventoried privately owned trees in front yards. This was done so that we would know where we could try and plant new trees on private property to replace those coming down, and unable to be replanted, on public property.

Our strategy focuses on blocks with a substantial concentration of Ash trees, where the loss of such trees would dramatically change the character of the street. We also are including parks for the same reason. In this initial phase there are "outlier" trees on other streets that we are not addressing, as a loss of a tree or two here and there would not dramatically alter the character of that block. We'll be looking at those at a later phase.

The strategy includes four basic components involving our strategic partners in our King Park Area neighborhoods, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, Inc. and the City of Indianapolis Department of Public Works (DPW) Urban Forestry Section:

  1. Public Tree Removal (DPW + Neighborhoods)
  2. Public Tree Removal + Replace (DPW + Neighborhoods + KIB)
  3. Public Tree New Planting (Neighborhoods + KIB)
  4. Private Tree New Planting (counter public tree removals) (Neighborhoods + KIB)
  5. Public Tree Insecticide Treatment (Neighborhoods)

Strategy Summary



Public Remove Public Replace Public New Private New Public Treat Net
Tree Change
FCP 14 63 11 38 26 +35
HMP 13 4 1 78 27 +66
ONS 2 13 8 0 114 +6
Total 29 80 20 116 167 +107

 

Neighborhood breakdown of the strategy:

Fall Creek Place

Pennsylvania Street: The tree lawns on Penn are too narrow to replant, with the exception being the "bump-outs" in the parking lane. Because of this, and the associated tree health issues and infrastructure problems, the trees would come down in the coming years REGARDLESS of the EAB issue. Knowing this, we will immediately remove select trees that have health issues and to open up the tree canopy to permit newly planted trees to grow. DPW will do this. The neighborhood will then remove the tree stumps. Working with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, the neighborhood will then plant new trees in the bump-outs and on adjacent private property, with permission. To buy time for these new trees to grow the neighborhood will also begin treating 1/3 of the remaining Ash with insecticide. This is only to buy time for 5-8 years, after which the remaining trees in the narrow tree lawn will be removed. Long term, all trees in the tree lawns, with the exception of the bump-outs, will be removed.

Delaware Street: These trees are young and have minimal growth, so it makes sense to replace them now rather than commit to a lifetime of treatment. DPW will remove all the trees in the bump-outs. The neighborhood will then remove the tree stumps. Working with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, the neighborhood will then plant new trees in the bump-outs.

2500 Block of Park Avenue. These trees are young and have minimal growth, so it makes sense to replace them now rather than commit to a lifetime of treatment. DPW will remove all the Ash trees. The neighborhood will then remove the tree stumps. Working with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, the neighborhood will then plant new trees.

Two other small clusters are being addressed. Two trees on Alabama near the former Churches Chicken are dying and will be replaced as they impact the character of that street as viewed from 22nd (they are opposite the vacant Churches parking lot. The others are low-quality maple trees planted in the neighborhood park on 25th Street that were inappropriately planted under power lines and subsequently topped by IPL. Their loss would change the character of that block of 25th Street and the park.

Herron Morton.

Pennsylvania Street: The vast majority of the Ash in HMP are on Penn. The tree lawns on Penn are too narrow to replant. Because of this, and the associated tree health issues and infrastructure problems, the trees would come down in the coming years REGARDLESS of the EAB issue. Knowing this, we will immediately remove select trees that have health issues and to open up the tree canopy to permit newly planted trees to grow. DPW will do this. The neighborhood will then remove the tree stumps. Working with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, the neighborhood will then plant new trees on adjacent private property, with permission. To buy time for these new trees to grow the neighborhood will also begin treating 1/3 of the remaining Ash with insecticide. This is only to buy time for 5-8 years, after which the remaining trees in the narrow tree lawn will be removed. Long term, all trees in the tree lawns will be removed.

Alabama Street: The ash on this street are being removed and replaced by DPW as part of a curb and sidewalk project. The curb is being moved a foot or so into the street to allow for the minimum 5' tree lawn to accomodate new trees.

Old Northside

Because the tree lawns in the Old Northside are, generally, wide the trees can remain long term. The Ash trees are generally more widespread and mature. These Ash will be treated with insecticide long-term.

Strategy Map
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